With All Your Heart

 

Like Diane Thrush, Stephen Hudson has found his vocation in teaching. Hudson’s days are full of high school students mastering — or struggling with — Algebra I and Geometry at the Design and Technology Academy at Roosevelt High School in San Antonio.

Hudson spent 12 years in ministry before circumstances took him in a different direction, so he brings to teaching an already-forged love of the Lord. Here, he applies a special piece of scripture to his teaching.

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by Stephen Hudson

with all heart for webTeaching has been a natural way for me to continue in ministry, and I really do think of it as that. Colossians 3:23 says, “Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as to the Lord, and not unto men.” This is my teaching verse.

 

“Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart …”
teaching, tutoring, grading papers, lesson planning, whatever, do it with all your heart.

This is a tough one, because this isn’t just a physical command. Yes, I do come home at night exhausted, because I give everything I have. But that’s not enough. I also need to give my heart. It’s real easy to get caught up in the complaining – how the kids don’t do this, or they don’t follow the rules, etc. But I have to remind myself to close my door to those external (and internal) voices that want to complain, instead focusing on the part where I give my heart to my work and my students. This is where that saying ‘What Would Jesus Do?’ really hits me. Would He be tough sometimes? Yes, because He sees the heart. But would He also be compassionate? Absolutely, always.

“As to the Lord…”
This isn’t about me, about my ego, about the respect that I am due. I don’t serve myself here. The more I get out of the way and remember that I am serving Him while I am at school, the smoother it goes.

“And not unto men.”
Believe it or not, this is the easiest part of the verse. Men (or “human masters” as other versions say) can be terrible bosses, fallible and subject to the same struggles we all are. Our Master, however, is fair, kind, loving, and forgiving. Serving Him correctly means that I will be able to withstand controversy when it comes, and it always comes. My conscience is clear. I don’t worry about my human ‘masters’ because I am serving Ssomeone higher than them.

I fully believe that I am in the right profession, and it challenges me every day, like Philippians 2:12, where I am “continuing to work out my salvation with fear and trembling.” My work is my mission field and my personal “salvation workshop,” as well.

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For your spiritual journey from The Episcopal Diocese of West Texas

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